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Thread: One foot or 2?

  1. #1
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    One foot or 2?

    I get differnt answers on this. When you race do you have all your weight on your outside foot? or 9010 or 7525 or like 5050? I have been told many different things and what to know what you guys think.
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  2. #2
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    That's a good question...Someone that knows what they are talking about please answer...lol

  3. #3

    Re: One foot or 2?

    Originally posted by skidude
    I get differnt answers on this.  When you race do you have all your weight on your outside foot?  or 9010 or 7525 or like 5050?  I have been told many different things and what to know what you guys think.
    The answer is YES, all of that. Depending on the terrain, the set, the turn, your equipment, and your level your weight bias will more or less of all of the above.

    That said - Today's "new" technique IS a two footed carve. The higher level the racer (the lower the handicap) the tendency will be towards a 50/50 bias for more of the course. The better the racer, however, the greater the level of "independent" leg action. So at one millisecond the bias can be 60/40 or 40/60 as the terrain and turn dictates.

    Skiing the "new" technique takes coaching and understanding of the fundamentals of the "new" turn. Most people don't just go out and start two foot carving; it’s very different from what most of us were taught during the last technical revolution (the A Frame and Hip Angulation).

    The stance is different and the body position is radically different from world cup style of only 5 years ago. I believe in the other threads there are tons of discussions on stance, drills and other elements of the new technique so I won't try and repeat them here.

    Probably the best thing any aspiring racer can do is find a local Racer who is willing to let you tuck in behind and get your "minds eye seeing" the turns develop in front of you. Most region's better Master's racers have it going and are willing to help out. Other than that find the guy who is killing the pacesetter at your local Nastar course (or the Pacesetter himself) and take a few runs with him or her.

    Seeing is believing and believe me the new technique takes a leap of faith to "get it" but it is like riding a bicycle, once you feel it you will use it with increasing frequency in your free skiing and racing.

    The Race is on - See ya in the Nastar standings!

  4. #4
    Anonymous
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    Thanks for the advice "Almost50'nFast", your always helpful.

  5. #5
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    Yeah you are very helpful. Thank you for all your help and keep it up.

    Thanks,
    Skidude
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  6. #6
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    1 or 2 feet

    2 feet -- but it's important to get both your skis up on edge.
    Inside foot -- try to draw it back under your body, if you let it sneek ahead, it ends up diverging away from your outside ski --- that means your skis are not tracking parallel.
    Roll the inside knee into the hill. Try to "feel" your little toe on the outside of your boot.
    STAY WAY FORWARD!!! Try to visualize your body going down the hill and "Pulling" your skis and legs along behind. You need to engage the front of your ski early in the turn.

    Now that you are thoroughly confused --- go sign up for a lesson at ski school or with your local Masters program!
    Hope this helps!

  7. #7

    Re: 1 or 2 feet

    Originally posted by brumbaughba
    2 feet -- but it's important to get both your skis up on edge.  
    Inside foot -- try to draw it back under your body, if you let it sneek ahead, it ends up diverging away from your outside ski --- that means your skis are not tracking parallel.  
    Roll the inside knee into the hill. Try to \"feel\" your little toe on the outside of your boot.  
    STAY WAY FORWARD!!! Try to visualize your body going down the hill and \"Pulling\" your skis and legs along behind. You need to engage the front of your ski early in the turn.  

    Now that you are thoroughly confused --- go sign up for a lesson at ski school or with your local Masters program!
    Hope this helps!
    VERY NICE IMAGERY! Join the memberlist, some of the forum members may want to get private advice from you.

  8. #8
    Senior Member jclose8's Avatar
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    Yes, I agree. Please register.
    The concept of pulling the inside foot back is probably the single best tip I've used in the last few years.
    You described it exactly. If your skis start diverging, and you start "leading" with your inside ski, you'll lose your downhill edge. It causes TOO much weight on the inside ski.
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  9. #9

    Pulling the inside foot back

    Not to take anything away from the fantastic tips from brumbaughba, whom I bet is a very accomplished racer (even if she is CHICK :P ), but before any racer can apply such advanced concepts as tipping, Big Edge, and drawing the inside ski back, they must get in the "Template". An example is the racer who sent me a pic from the Jackson Hole Master's GS, he mentioned he needed to get his inside foot back when in actuality he needed to get his outside hand up and driving forward. It was his lagging hand which was causing his hips to counter (open downhill) and throw his weight a little bit back to his heels. Trying to draw his inside foot back at that point would only compound his issues. In error recognition I like to see what is causing the problem, sometimes working on an opposite area fixes the problem without addressing the offending limb (if you will) other times you must address the casue itself first (such as the racer who is dropping his head into the turn throwing his balance off all the way down his body).

    That said, I did want to clarify one thing. Pulling the inside foot back IS a great idea/concept once you are making that "square" turn. Pulling the foot back is the last thing you work on to "find" the weight on the inside ski and to find what I call the Tipping Point. Its an exercise more than a practical technique application (except for the most advanced racers). Try pulling your inside ski back in a race course, its just to distracting to effect. When you get everything lined up right, then you mess around with that in your free skiing until the balance point and weight bias adjustments become second nature. Then it will following you into the race course naturally.

    Again, I'm just trying to fill in the "gaps" for our HIGHER handicap racers and not taking anything away from the great imagery and tips of our anonymous brumbaughba.

  10. #10
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    Register...and see if you can confuse me a little more...Right now my coaches are telling me I just need to get my feet wider apart as the biggest thing, and then after that I guess I can deal with my feet more. :roll:
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