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Thread: How do you tune?

  1. #1
    Senior Member chuckp7600's Avatar
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    How do you tune?

    How do you tune your skis? Curious how many steps you go through and how often.

    This is really the first year that I have done anything but periodically wax my skis. Last year they got waxed every 3 or so days out.

    This year I bought a kit from racewax and read enough on various internet sites to be mildly dangerous. But this is the process I've been following for every 1-2 trips out

    1) Run my edger tool down the sides of the edges with a diamond stone in it 3 times or so. I do this dry and it seems to work OK
    2) Nylon brush the bases to clean any gunk off
    3) Hot crayon some saucer wax on the bases - incidentally this is my only gripe with saucer wax, because they are round pucks it doesn't work as easily as a brick until you get a ways into the puck. I think when I replenish my supply I'll figure out how to use a hot wire and cut the pucks in half.

    4) Iron the wax
    5) Scrape
    6) polish with white scotchbrite to clean up the scrape marks

    For a while I was brushing the wax, but it seemed to remove more wax than I wanted - 5 hrs of skiing on mn ice seemed to remove enough wax by itself. I've tried crayoning and corking an overlay that I got from saucer as well but didn't really notice any difference so I havn't bothered with that again either.

    Total time spent is 15-30 minutes depending on how many times I get interupted with other things.
    Last edited by chuckp7600; 02-28-2012 at 08:32 PM.

  2. #2
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    Not bad. That method will get the job done. One thing, you should always use some form of lubricant when using a diamond stone. I like to use Sun Valleys Secret Sauce ($13). You are greatly reducing the life of your diamond stone by not using a lubricant.

    Also, brushing your base is a MUST. You CANNOT skip this step if you want fast skies. The wax bonding with your base is what makes skies fast, not the wax by itself. When you ski over snow the friction from the ski on the snow produces heat and that heat melts the snow under your ski, so when you are skiing you are gliding over a fine layer of water produced by that heat. The water is like miniature ball bearings under your ski. The structure in your ski channels that water away. Now this is why brushing is so important. You need to expose that structure to channel that water away or else you just create suction which in turn creates slow skies. Brushing is the most over looked step in waxing and where most people screw up their wax job. This is why there are so many different brushes and why in a brushing process you will usually use a minimum of 3 different brushes.

    Hope this makes sense and helps some. I'm happy to answer any other waxing questions you may have.

  3. #3
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    My method is as follows:

    1- run diamond stove over base edge
    2- work side edge with several diamond and ceramic stones
    3- brush base out with a steel brush followed by white fibertex
    4- hot scrape to clean the base
    5- brush out
    6- hot wax 1-2 layers of wax of the day. let cool at least an hour before scraping and brushing using a steel brush, horsehair brush and polishing brush.
    7 - Wax in a LF or HF wax. let cool and scrape and brush as stated above.

    That is the method I use. I usually wax every 2-4 times I go out, when conditions change so I need to re-wax or my base is showing signs of needing to be waxed. Personally I use Fast Wax. Again, Hope this helps.

  4. #4
    Senior Member chuckp7600's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nov439 View Post
    Also, brushing your base is a MUST. You CANNOT skip this step if you want fast skis.
    Alright, I'll add back in that step

  5. #5
    Senior Member IN.racer's Avatar
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    My steps as follows:
    • Place the ski edge side up in the vise. Rework the side edge using a fine diamond file in a beast side edge tool with a 3? plate. I dunk the whole tool with file in a small bucket of warm dish soapy water for lubrication, then towel dry everything as I do the edge about 18 to 20 inches at a time. Focus mainly on the inside edge, but also touch up the outside edge. When done, lightly hit the now very sharp edge with a fine soapy wet diamond file to remove any micro small hanging bur. I never sharpen the base edge, only lightly de-bur if needed. *Before doing any side edge sharpening, side walls must be planed.
    • Place the ski base side up in the vise and brush several strokes tip to tail with a fine stainless steel brush. Wipe clean with a rag.
    • Crayon on Dominator base renew w/graphite. This wax is very soft. Cork into base with heavy pressure.
    • Crayon over the top of the Dominator your favorite race wax. Now iron drip same race wax and iron into base. Do the other ski as this one cools.
    • Scrape excess wax from cooled ski, lightly rotobrush w/nylon. Cork again like mad evening out what wax is left and drive it into the base of the ski. Rotobrush with horsehair now removing any heavy thick wax. Finish with soft hand horsehair brush.
    • At this point you can add an overlay if you feel the need.
    • NOTE: My skis are always initially set up by SkiMD in Framingham MA; Skimd.com. My hand tunes just maintain the edges and bases they create. Depending on how bad I tear them up, they usually need a fresh base/edge grind every 1? to 2 years.
    • SAFETY: Always wear mechanic type gloves with wrist protection especially corking and brushing around very sharp edges.
    • Edit: I do this every mid week so they are ready to race on weekends. A pair of skis takes 30 to 40 minutes.
    Last edited by IN.racer; 02-29-2012 at 09:39 PM.
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  6. #6
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    IN.racer's list is good. Personally, I would do the base renew as a hot scrape particularly if you use fluoros to ensure you start with a clean ski.
    I am not sure about crayoning and then dripping the same wax. Seems like one step extra. You only need as much wax as is contacting the base.
    I do hand brushing rather than roto. I don't cork after I brush.
    If I use overlays I apply them at the start, most only last a run and I like to do warmups and course inspection without carrying an extra set of skis.
    If you use fluoros, wear a respirator.

  7. #7
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    I think the crayon then drip technique is intended put some wax on the base before touching the ski with an iron, to avoid burning the base.

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