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Thread: what is the best way to hit gates?

  1. #21
    Anonymous
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    Carlsbad

    Originally posted by David Victorious
    Hey Roger,

    I raced the entire MrPibb National circuit in 77-79.

    My Saddleback run in  (Saddleback Saturday) with Wardy was in 78 the day before the big one at Carlsbad.

    8)
    I had lots of bad luck at Carlsbad, but loved it. I was long out of MX by '77 and onto skiing, started working at Snow Summit in the Winter of '73-'74 with my great pal Chris Riddle (yes, once again, Bryce Riddle, Last Year's Men's Expert 13 - 14 National Champ is his son, my student and my favorite Rent-a-Kid). Chris now runs Snow Summit Corporation (Snow Summit, Bear Mountain and Sierra Summit).

    Hey man, have we ever met? Did you know Steve Gordon? Thanks for waking up those OLD memories. What machine were you on (must of been a Jap bike by then). I came out of retirement and rode one Saddleback Saturday race sometime in the early '80's, I was on a Suzuki 400. I've got some pics of that day, will have to locate them. I got both hole shots :lol:

    Thanks again! Hook up with me when at PCMR!

    RD

  2. #22
    Anonymous
    Guest

    Re: Perspective

    [quote]
    Gary, thanks for your help, you ARE THE BEST, can't wait for that book.
    It's nice to see your racers going to bat for you Coach!! You must be OK, for an older guy.......... :P :P :lol: :lol:

    See you a a couple of weeks!!


    Thanks Bear! You are too kind, as always!

    "Dirty Harry"

  3. #23
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    Hey Skiodor,

    My bikes were RMs. I rode the 250 and the 480. The Saddleback day I speak of was on the 250.

    As for the PCMR, I got an invite but won’t attend this year.

    I find your NASTAR advice and knowledge second to none.

    A book would do well in the market place as no one covers the subtleties of NASTAR specifically.

    8)
    The Quest, it's a beautiful thing.

  4. #24
    Anonymous
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    High tuck--I stand corrected

    I stand corrected about the high tuck, which I had misunderstood. You've hit the nail on the head, and in fact, your advice is part of correcting a bad habit I had that cost me time in Super G, which is opening up too much (your description of hands low, my description hands out and low) instead of staying more aerodynamic with hands high and forward when I can.

    Thanks for clarifying, and my apologies for misconstruing your original post.

    Dean.

  5. #25
    Anonymous
    Guest

    Re: High tuck--I stand corrected

    Originally posted by sfdgloster
    I stand corrected about the high tuck, which I had misunderstood.  You've hit the nail on the head, and in fact, your advice is part of correcting a bad habit I had that cost me time in Super G, which is opening up too much (your description of hands low, my description hands out and low)  instead of staying more aerodynamic with hands high and forward when I can.    

    Thanks for clarifying, and my apologies for misconstruing your original post.

    Dean.
    Dean, no apologies necessary, it is the dialogue that brings out the best in all of us. Glad you did well in your SuperG!


    Go CU

  6. #26

    Angry I have found differently.......

    Quote Originally Posted by Anonymous View Post
    In club racing, the top racers (NASTAR equivalent handicaps of below 10)vary widely in the amount of gate contact they get. Some hit a lot of gates. Others brush gates or almost brush them.

    The most critical issue, though, is not how much gate contact you have, but where your turn is. Is it mostly above the gate, a high, early (good) line? If so, you'll be fast, and if you hit the gates solidly, natural counter (inside shoulder forward as the upper body faces down the fall line while skis are coming across the hill toward the next gate) will also mean you won't hit the gates square, getting knocked into the back seat and screwing up your next turn. (If you're just starting your turn or even in the middle of it, solid impact with a gate at GS speeds can create a dangerous combination, for the next turn--a late, low line and starting your transition in the back seat...)

    At the flat top and bottom, more people have more gate contact, since (A) it's easier to get correctly, without risk of wrong-footing a gate and crashing, (B) there's less danger of getting knocked into the back seat without time to set up your next turn, and © there's a bigger payoff and less risk for the direct line (see Ron LeMaster's online slide show for a discussion of the tradeoffs in picking a tighter line, here:

    http://www.ronlemaster.com/USSCAAcademy-20...files/frame.htm

    Last year, at Nationals, I had contact with just less than half the gates. Bodie Miller hit them all.

    Regarding someone's advice above that you should just stay in a high tuck (unless I misunderstood the post) that isn't advice well suited for the very turny GS course they had the last two years on Payday for the 40-44 year olds. You really need to make GS turns in the very turny steeper parts of the course, and there's no way you could do that in a high tuck.

    (My best event is Super G, I turn well in a tuck, and there is no way I could have done anything but the very top and bottom of the Payday course last year (or the year before) in a tuck. By contrast, I took the whole Park City pay NASTAR course in a tuck that same day, as a warm up, just riding the ruts. You just can't do it, though, and carve and stay in the course on the turnier, steeper Payday sections.)

    Finally--clearing GS gates isn't recommended. I'd recommend just straightening your inside arm, thrusting it forward and putting your inside shoulder forward to create hip angulation/counter and reduce drag at gate impact. (Inside shoulder forward is controversial, and not recommended if it means you no longer pressure the inside foot forward boot cuff as a result.) That "door opening" gesture at gate clear is pretty old school.

    Dean.
    At the flat top and bottom, more people have more gate contact, since (A) it's easier to get correctly, without risk of wrong-footing a gate and crashing, (B) there's less danger of getting knocked into the back seat without time to set up your next turn, and © there's a bigger payoff and less risk for the direct line.

    At Ski Brule in MI, NASTAR is run on WhiteWater which has a very flat top with a huge headwall and a flat outrun. If I hit the top gates my times are slower than if I don't because it slows me down. For added proof, I am 158lbs. and have raced 200lb. people wearing race suits while I wear baggy ski clothes and I still beat their times by not hitting the gates.

  7. #27
    Senior Member Kanakry's Avatar
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    Holy old thread!

  8. #28
    Administrator JTBear's Avatar
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    Wow, Jason, no kidding! This was dug deep out of the archives in the basement of this Forum........
    <img src=http://pic100.picturetrail.com/VOL425/637370/22527991/376059857.jpg border=0 alt= />
    Carve Diem!! Charge The Course!!

  9. #29
    Senior Member Kanakry's Avatar
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    Jr you should come run nastar at mqt next year. H and I will drive up for that

  10. #30

    Agreed

    Quote Originally Posted by AttitudeXX View Post
    At Ski Brule in MI, NASTAR is run on WhiteWater which has a very flat top with a huge headwall and a flat outrun. If I hit the top gates my times are slower than if I don't because it slows me down. For added proof, I am 158lbs. and have raced 200lb. people wearing race suits while I wear baggy ski clothes and I still beat their times by not hitting the gates.
    I can attest to this! I am 145 pounds and the same thing happens to me(heck we may have even raced together!!). The only gates i hit are the one gate at the top just before the headwall, and the one or two where the headwall bottoms out. After that, im in the smallest tuck possible. This results in times of around 20-23 seconds.(I'm 14 years old)

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