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SkierScott
02-27-2008, 12:57 AM
QUESTIONS FOR JIMMY COCHRAN


What advice would you give in the following topics?

If the advice varies by type of course (GS vs. SL) please discuss both.

Also if the advice varies by level, please use the following levels: First Time Racer, Bronze Racer, Silver Racer, Gold Racer, Platinum Racer.

1. Course Inspection (fall-aways, knolls, terrain changes, trail turns, hairpins, flushes, delays/under gates, snow conditions, lighting conditions, finishing gate sequence)

2. Race Day Routine / Rituals / Warm Up (drills, exercises)

3. Start Technique (mental thoughts & imagery, type of start - kick start vs. pole start, # skating steps, impact of start ramp angle / start ramp length / direction of first gate relative to starting wand)

4. Actual Race (tactics)

5. Finish Technique (tuck, reach with one hand forward to break timing beam, line from last gate through finish)

6. Free Skiing Drills (thousand steps, one ski, Schlopy/Heisman, javelin, etc.)

7. Gate Drills (Wagner, etc.)



Also I am interested in your perspective about the stivot technique.

a) How do you describe a stivot?

Here is are some photo sequences of the stivot from Ron LeMaster

Bode Miller - Park City GS, 2003, 1st run

http://ronlemaster.com/images/2003-2004/sl...de-pc-gs-1.html (http://ronlemaster.com/images/2003-2004/slides/bode-pc-gs-1.html)

James Cochran - Beaver Creek SL, 2004, 1st run

http://ronlemaster.com/images/latest-image...-2004-sl-1.html (http://ronlemaster.com/images/latest-images/slides/cochran-bc-2004-sl-1.html)



Video of stivot

WCSN video of Francois Bourque's 2007 FIS World Cup GS run at Karnjska Gora, Slovenia

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IcvOYmK7cgA

Video of Ivica Kostelic (bib #5), Rainer Schoenfelder (bib #6) & Benjamin Raich (bib #3) 2004 FIS World Cup SL run at Wengen, Switzerland

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JGQ9egMTW9s


I have seen various descriptions including:

"Pivot - Float/Feather - Hook up edge to carve bottom of turn while keeping skier center of mass pointed in the intended direction of travel."

"Combined steering and pivoting movement at the start of the turn. Pivot skis dramatically early in the turn. Once skis have bitten snow, redirected and even slowed a bit, pivot skis back outward to desired line to carve." Ron LeMaster - USST consultant
http://www.ronlemaster.com/articles/Aksel%...d%20Svindal.pdf (http://www.ronlemaster.com/articles/Aksel%20Lund%20Svindal.pdf)

"Stivot-Feather-Butter The Toast" The key is to maintain the balance of the center of the foot to retain control of where the pressure is added instead of initiating a stivot with a windshield wiper turns (initiated from the ski tips). Pete Deisroth - ACA Ontario Ski Team Women's Head Coach
www.alpineontario.ca/site/content/files/Collingwood%20Presentation%202007-%20Pete%20Deisroth.pdf (http://www.alpineontario.ca/site/content/files/Collingwood%20Presentation%202007-%20Pete%20Deisroth.pdf)

"Rotating the ski tips in on approach to a gate, sliding to check speed, then rotating tips back out to direction of turn to lock skis in for the turn around the gate" Adam Chadbourne - USSA Development Program
www.njsra.org/images/VARA%20Coaches%20Ed%2015%20Sep%2007.pdf (http://www.njsra.org/images/VARA%20Coaches%20Ed%2015%20Sep%2007.pdf)

"It's just when you slide your skis sideways and are redirecting into the turn. It's actively re-directing the skis, as opposed to letting them carve to redirect themselves. And you do it to get rid of speed that you don't want. And you do it to cut off line. You do it before you have the skis heavily weighted. It's much easier obviously. If you have them weighted and you chuck them sideways and displace a huge amount of snow and you slow down a lot." Bode Miller - USST
http://mysnowsports.com/main_cpg/Forums/viewtopic/p=61.html



b) When should a stivot be used?

It seems that by cutting off the top of the turn the stivot allows for a lower, straighter, more direct line than a pure arc to arc turn. Is this only for cranker turns where pure arcs are virtually impossible, steep icy terrain, awkward sections of course where speed or direction control are required for or is it also used in other situations like recovering a lost line?

c) On average how many stivots do you use in a GS course?

d) What is the range of number of stivots that you have used in a GS course (0-3, 0-5, etc)

e) On average how many stivots do you use in a SL course?

f) What is the range of number of stivots that you have used in a SL course (0-3, 0-5, etc)

g) What free skiing & gate drills have you found helpful to learn the stivot technique?



PLEASE FEEL FREE TO POST OTHER QUESTIONS IN THIS THREAD

EvanMiller
02-27-2008, 01:28 AM
i'm thinking this one is going to take awhile to answer... in the meantime:

Remember to register to ski with the U.S. Ski Team at Sugarloaf!

http://www.usskiteam.com/contest/pic/WebSweepstakes.jpg (http://www.usskiteam.com/contest/index.php?cId=49)

:D ;D

JimmyCochran
02-27-2008, 01:33 AM
QUESTIONS FOR JIMMY COCHRAN


What advice would you give in the following topics?

If the advice varies by type of course (GS vs. SL) please discuss both.

Also if the advice varies by level, please use the following levels: First Time Racer, Bronze Racer, Silver Racer, Gold Racer, Platinum Racer.

1. Course Inspection (fall-aways, knolls, terrain changes, trail turns, hairpins, flushes, delays/under gates, snow conditions, lighting conditions, finishing gate sequence)

The important thing here is knowing where any "feature" (knoll, hairpin, nasty rut, etc.) is in the course and how it is going to feel when you race through it. Idealy after you've inspected you know exactly how it will feel to run a course. That way there are no surprises and you can look for speed. That being said it's not always possible to predict the way a course will finally run, so you have to always remember to be ready to get creative and adapt during your race run.

2. Race Day Routine / Rituals / Warm Up (drills, exercises)

This is something that each person needs to figure out for themselves. Personally I like to free ski at least 4 to 5 runs before each run of the race. I drink sugary drinks through out the day to stay hydrated, and I ALWAYS put on my left ski first. No joke.

3. Start Technique (mental thoughts & imagery, type of start - kick start vs. pole start, # skating steps, impact of start ramp angle / start ramp length / direction of first gate relative to starting wand)

Explode out of the start by kicking feet back while pushing hard with poles. It's important to direct all the energy down the hill instead of up. Once out of the start it's important to skate skate skate. Once your moving a bit, a good push off of your leg is much more effective than poling. This is probably due in part to ski racers having such strong legs comparitively weak upper bodies. Our poles are so short too. Bode is a great example of a fast start where he poles for every three leg pushes or so.
4. Actual Race (tactics)

5. Finish Technique (tuck, reach with one hand forward to break timing beam, line from last gate through finish)

Yeah. Exactly. Reach as far forward as possible with one arm. A ski pole will not break the infared timing beam so flinging the poles forward is a waste.

6. Free Skiing Drills (thousand steps, one ski, Schlopy/Heisman, javelin, etc.) I personally like the Schlopy/heisman. I also like skiing on one ski... this is a great way to learn how to not sit back. It's virtually impossible to sit back on one ski cause it requires so much strength to simply stay over the ski. Sit back and you collapse. It's also good for balance.

7. Gate Drills (Wagner, etc.)

I'm not a huge fan of gate drills in general. I prefer to just run gates. The one exeption is stubbies in SL. When I was younger I felt like skiing stubbies was good for being disciplined with my hands. Not having to woory about cross blocking a gate meant that I could focus on keeping my hands exactly where they were supposed to be.

Also I am interested in your perspective about the stivot technique.

a) How do you describe a stivot?

First off: a stivot is not faster than a carved turn. However there are times (particularly on a steep pitch) where you want to control and simply maintain your speed instead of continuing to accelerate. In this case a stivot is a handy tool. In my own training I try to minimize this move. Every year more and more of the turn/turns are arced. One other place where a stivot works well is in a recovery situation where you are so far off line that arcing the entire turn would not allow you to make the next gate (There is a limit to the radius that a ski can arc after all). By stivoting you can cut off the top of the turn and sneak back on to the proper line.

Here is are some photo sequences of the stivot from Ron LeMaster

Bode Miller - Park City GS, 2003, 1st run

http://ronlemaster.com/images/2003-2004/sl...de-pc-gs-1.html (http://ronlemaster.com/images/2003-2004/slides/bode-pc-gs-1.html)

James Cochran - Beaver Creek SL, 2004, 1st run

http://ronlemaster.com/images/latest-image...-2004-sl-1.html (http://ronlemaster.com/images/latest-images/slides/cochran-bc-2004-sl-1.html)

Video of stivot

WCSN video of Francois Bourque's 2007 World Cup GS run at Karnjska Gora, Slovenia

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IcvOYmK7cgA

I have seen various descriptions including:

"Pivot - Float/Feather - Hook up edge to carve bottom of turn while keeping skier center of mass pointed in the intended direction of travel."

"Combined steering and pivoting movement at the start of the turn. Pivot skis dramatically early in the turn. Once skis have bitten snow, redirected and even slowed a bit, pivot skis back outward to desired line to carve." Ron LeMaster - USST consultant
http://www.ronlemaster.com/articles/Aksel%...d%20Svindal.pdf (http://www.ronlemaster.com/articles/Aksel%20Lund%20Svindal.pdf)

"Stivot-Feather-Butter The Toast" The key is to maintain the balance of the center of the foot to retain control of where the pressure is added instead of initiating a stivot with a windshield wiper turns (initiated from the ski tips). Pete Deisroth - ACA Ontario Ski Team Women's Head Coach
www.alpineontario.ca/site/content/files/Collingwood%20Presentation%202007-%20Pete%20Deisroth.pdf (http://www.alpineontario.ca/site/content/files/Collingwood%20Presentation%202007-%20Pete%20Deisroth.pdf)

"Rotating the ski tips in on approach to a gate, sliding to check speed, then rotating tips back out to direction of turn to lock skis in for the turn around the gate" Adam Chadbourne - USSA Development Program
www.njsra.org/images/VARA%20Coaches%20Ed%2015%20Sep%2007.pdf (http://www.njsra.org/images/VARA%20Coaches%20Ed%2015%20Sep%2007.pdf)

"It's just when you slide your skis sideways and are redirecting into the turn. It's actively re-directing the skis, as opposed to letting them carve to redirect themselves. And you do it to get rid of speed that you don't want. And you do it to cut off line. You do it before you have the skis heavily weighted. It's much easier obviously. If you have them weighted and you chuck them sideways and displace a huge amount of snow and you slow down a lot." Bode Miller - USST
http://mysnowsports.com/main_cpg/Forums/viewtopic/p=61.html



b) When should a stivot be used?

It seems that by cutting off the top of the turn the stivot allows for a lower, straighter, more direct line than a pure arc to arc turn. Is this only for cranker turns where pure arcs are virtually impossible, steep icy terrain, awkward sections of course where speed or direction control are required for or is it also used in other situations like recovering a lost line?

c) On average how many stivots do you use in a GS course?

Some courses it can be almost all and others it is be none. Stivoting or not stivoting is a judgment that is made at the beginning of each turn. When I come into a turn I decide if a pure arc or a stivot is the best approach. A stivot is always safer though arcing the entire turn is always faster. So there's a compromise

d) What is the range of number of stivots that you have used in a GS course (0-3, 0-5, etc)

Say 50 turns in a gs, so probably some races I'll use maybe 30. Or none of course if the hill is easy.

e) On average how many stivots do you use in a SL course?

depends entirely on the hill. Our last race in Zagreb I used probably 4. At the upcoming race in Kransjka Gora about one third of the hill calls for stivots

f) What is the range of number of stivots that you have used in a SL course (0-3, 0-5, etc)

Same as GS

g) What free skiing & gate drills have you found helpful to learn the stivot technique? Just a tight turny steep course is all you need. Or just a steep pitch to free ski on for that matter. Personally I think it would be more rewarding to practice arcing turns in situation where stivoting is called for. That's how you really push yourself out of your comfort zone and hence improve.



PLEASE FEEL FREE TO POST OTHER QUESTIONS IN THIS THREAD[/b]

SkierScott
02-27-2008, 02:00 AM
Dear Jimmy,

Thanks for your great responses to my questions.

I just have a few follow up questions.

2. Race Day Routine / Rituals / Warm Up (drills, exercises) What do you focus on while free skiing before each run of the race (drills, turn shape, weight distribution during each phase of the turn, etc.)


3. Start Technique - Do you use any mental thoughts or imagery to focus on when in the start or on the course? If so, what do you specifically focus on? What thoughts would you advise racers to focus on by racer level ("elbows up", "quiet upper body", "early", "forward", etc.) How do you decide when to quit skating after the start & what is the range of number of skates that you do in GS? in SL?


4. Actual Race - What tactics would you advise racers to focus on in the race course by racer level (round turns high on rise line, etc.)


a. How do you describe the stivot move? Do you feel that the stivot is more of an unpressured float or a steered pressured feather move? Also, did any of the various descriptions that I had mentioned above accurately capture the stivot move?

Were you doing a stivot in this Ron LeMaster photo sequence of yourself at Beaver Creek SL 2004? If not, how would you describe the move that you made in this sequence?

James Cochran - Beaver Creek SL, 2004, 1st run

http://ronlemaster.com/images/latest-image...-2004-sl-1.html (http://ronlemaster.com/images/latest-images/slides/cochran-bc-2004-sl-1.html)

JimmyCochran
02-27-2008, 03:04 AM
Dear Jimmy,

Thanks for your great responses to my questions.

I just have a few follow up questions.

2. Race Day Routine / Rituals / Warm Up (drills, exercises) What do you focus on while free skiing before each run of the race (drills, turn shape, weight distribution during each phase of the turn, etc.)


3. Start Technique - Do you use any mental thoughts or imagery to focus on when in the start or on the course? If so, what do you specifically focus on? What thoughts would you advise racers to focus on by racer level ("elbows up", "quiet upper body", "early", "forward", etc.) How do you decide when to quit skating after the start & what is the range of number of skates that you do in GS? in SL?


4. Actual Race - What tactics would you advise racers to focus on in the race course by racer level (round turns high on rise line, etc.)


a. How do you describe the stivot move? Do you feel that the stivot is more of an unpressured float or a steered pressured feather move? Also, did any of the various descriptions that I had mentioned above accurately capture the stivot move?

Were you doing a stivot in this Ron LeMaster photo sequence of yourself at Beaver Creek SL 2004? If not, how would you describe the move that you made in this sequence?

James Cochran - Beaver Creek SL, 2004, 1st run

http://ronlemaster.com/images/latest-image...-2004-sl-1.html (http://ronlemaster.com/images/latest-images/slides/cochran-bc-2004-sl-1.html)[/b]

During pre race free skiing, I focus on whatever I have been working on. Lately it has been down-unweighting at the end of one turn (so as to avoid going airborne in the transition) and arcing into the next. I also spend some time adjust my boots until they feel just right (snug but not tight).
At the start I usally think about that same thing I was thinking about in freeskiing. Exceptions are when a course calls for some carefully executed tactics (like a huge rut/hole that needs to be avoided). In those cases I focus solely those things that will keep me out of the fence. Although sometimes trying hard to stay out of the fence is the very thing that puts you there.
Knowing when to stop skating is just a matter of feeling when you are going faster than you can skate. Sometimes an extra skate or two can mean alot of time. You can also easily end up on your face. It comes down to feel.
This is something that each racer needs to find for themself. Different focuses can mean different things to different people. The importantthing is to keep it simple. Sometimes thinking about nothing at all is the best mindset for an athlete. It's completely personal, though I venture to guess that no athlete performs better with an overwhelming amount of data floating through their head. At what point does it become overwhelming? For me I can handle one thing and nothing more.
I'd say in general there is very little direction change happening during a stivot. This implies that it is more of an unpressured float than a steered pressured feather. We call it the "float and sting".
This sequence is a good example of what my current focus is trying to combat. You can see that I'm in the air in the transition. While in the air I'm drifting both down and across the hill from the next gate. When I finally do touch down I have no choice but to point my skis directly back into the course (smoothly arcing a turn here would take way too long and cause my line to be way low in relation to the next gate). Because of this air time, I took a longer line than I could have, and I lost speed due to the braking action of my sideways traveling skis. This is an example of a recovery stivot.

putterman
02-27-2008, 03:10 AM
At what level do you think us regular NASTARers should be considering the stivot? Is this something that seasoned pros use (for a reason), or is it something that should be in all of our arsenals?

JimmyCochran
02-27-2008, 03:26 AM
At what level do you think us regular NASTARers should be considering the stivot? Is this something that seasoned pros use (for a reason), or is it something that should be in all of our arsenals?[/b]

I think the better you get (and the more fearless you become) the less you will have to use a stivot. It's worth knowing how to do... as a way to get back on line (say you're really behind the tempo of a course, almost missing gates), or you find yourself racing on a really steep pitch where it's impossible to arc every turn cleanly. I think you'll find that if you resist the urge to stivot, you'll be faster.

SkierScott
02-27-2008, 03:45 AM
8. Speed Suit - How much time is a speed suit worth on a typical 20 second NASTAR GS course? on a typical 70 second / 50 turn FIS GS course? a typical 50 second / 60 turn FIS SL course? Have you seen any data &/or know from personal experience about the speed suit gain?

I have heard anecdotal data that on the Park City 17 second NASTAR GS course compared to a speed suit: a vest/training shorts added 0.3 seconds, coat/suit bottoms added 0.75 seconds and coat/pants added 1.25 seconds; on a Marquette MI USSA 25 second course 0.8-1.1 seconds.


9. Line - How much time can one gain by tightening up the line around the gate by 6" (assuming that one can still carve the tighter line) on a FIS GS course? by 6" on a FIS SL course? I have heard figures ranging from 1/100th of a second to 1/10th of a second for each gate that you can tighten the line by 6".

SkierScott
03-03-2008, 09:31 PM
Additional questions. Please see #8-9 above plus #10-11 below.

10. Pressure Management - What is your overall target for outside ski / inside ski pressure for SL? 80/20? for GS? 70/30? by turn phase (initiation, turning, completion) for SL? for GS?

11. Development System - What aspects do you like about the current US development system? What aspects can be improved? Is there anything USST can learn from other countries like Austria, Switzerland, Italy, Canada, etc.? I have been impressed by the free online resources that CSCF provides especially the videos, pdfs, drills for the Husky Snow Stars http://www.vivatexte.com/eprep/cscf/husky/ (http://www.vivatexte.com/eprep/cscf/husky/) program. How do we connect the skiing public with our teams and our athletes?


Stivot usage percentage range on a given course - If I understood your answer regarding stivots correctly, the stivot usage percentage range for GS is 0-60%? SL 0-30%?